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K’ Tae Mai Kā Tchakat Tuatehi

K’ Tae Mai Kā Tchakat Tuatehi

na Hokotehi Moriori Trust
Rē Moriori na Kiwi Hammond
kā pokoko ririma na Scott Irvine


Story outline

This story tells of the voyage of two brave brothers, Rongomaiwhenua (Peace on the land) and Rongomaitere (Peace on the ocean). The brothers sailed from their tropical island home to Rēkohu. They set up altars and pou to show the creatures that they intended to live in peace in this new land. Rongomaitere sailed on to the west and gave instructions for later waka to return to Rēkohu. Rongomaiwhenua stayed on the island, and all people known as Moriori come from him and his children. This is the Moriori hokopapa line.

Learning context

This story can connect how people travelled throughout the Pacific prior to European influence.

There are many examples of voyages that include:

  • traditions of migration
  • navigation by the stars
  • following wave and wind directions 
  • watching bird flight patterns
  • using cloud formations to find particular places.

Students can be directed to research one or more of these topics to further explore the ideas expressed in this story. 

Before reading the story

Before you read the story together, look at the illustrations and talk about what you see happening, drawing on students’ prior knowledge:

  • Page 10 – What do you think this story is about?
  • Page 11 – Why might the two brothers be looking up at the birds? (Along with the stars, the flight paths of birds such as hopo (albatross) can be used to aid navigation.)
  • Page 12 – What are these people doing? (They are erecting a pou – a carved wooden post used to mark places of significance or to commemorate people of note.)
  • Page 14 – Where do you think the people on the waka are going?

Flashcards

For key vocabulary in this story, you could make flashcards with an image and the phrase. For this story, these words and phrases are:

Nouns

hokopapa – genealogy (line)

hopo – albatross

kaing’ – home

manu – birds

mimiha – seals

moana – sea

motchu – island

pou tūāpoi – ancient pole

ika – fish

rongo – peace

tau – year

tchimirik – children

terikarawao – forest trees 

tuahu – altar

Verbs

noho – to stay

tāngahiwa – to want 

timat’ – to start

tītīmai – to push (into the ground),
to place

Time markers/Sentence starters:

Wa roa – For a long time 

Khia rau tau i mua – Many hundreds of years ago

Nō rauu taenga ki – When they (two) arrived at 

Grammar

Some important language structures in this story are:

Descriptive sentences
  • e kaing’ manu – a home to the birds 

Other examples of this structure are:

  • e kaing’ mimiha – a home to the seals 
  • e kaing’ ika – a home to the fish
Older and younger siblings
  • tokoteru kā rūtapa – tuakana tehi, muritae tehi – two brave brothers – one older, one younger 

Another example of this use is: 

  • Ko tama tuakana-muritae taingo' … – The older and younger brothers’ names were …
The phrase 'were different'
  • e me ika kē – the fish were different 

Another example of this use is: 

  • e me manu kē, e me tipu kē – the birds were different, the things growing were different.

Follow-up activities

These follow-up activities will give students the opportunity to practise pronunciation and extend their knowledge of vocabulary and simple language structures: 

  1. Practise saying these names:
    Rongomaiwhenua (Peace on the land) (Rongo/mai/whenua)
    Rongomaitere (Peace on the ocean) (Rongo/mai/tere)
  2. Practise saying this sentence. Start by saying each phrase slowly, then add them together to form the complete sentence:
    Rē Moriori – Wa roa / k’ noho / kā motchu o Rēkohu / e kaing’ manu, / e kaing’ mimiha, / e kaing’ ika, / e kaing’ terikarawao.
    English – For a long time / the islands of Rēkohu were home / only to the birds, / seals, / fish, / and forest trees. 
    (Note: The structure of the Moriori sentence and the English translation are not the same as the English has been summarised. The use of forward slashes '/' in the English is indicative and not exact.) 
  3. Try this activity using these sentences starters:
    Khia rau tau i mua …/… Many hundreds of years ago …
    Nō rauu taenga / ki … When they arrived … 
    Extension: Repeat the sentence fluently without mistakes:
    Wa roa k’ noho kā motchu o Rēkohu … Wa roa k’noho kā motchu o Rēkohu … 

Cloze follow-up activities

These follow-up cloze activities will give students the opportunity to practise pronunciation and extend their knowledge of vocabulary and simple language structures: 

Wa roa k’ noho kā motchu o __________ e kaing’ mimiha, e kaing’ ika, e terikarawao.

For a long time the islands of Rēkohu were home only to the birds, seals, fish, and forest trees.

Ko tama tukana-muritae taingo’ ko __________ rauu ko __________.

The brothers’ names were Rongomaiwhenua (peace on the land and Rongomaitere (peace on the ocean).

Nō rauu taenga ki ta __________ hou e me ika kē, e me __________ kē, e me tipu kē o konei ki kā me pērā o ta __________ o mua. 

When they came to their new island home the creatures (fish, birds, plants) around them were different from those at home.

K’ noho ko __________ ki ta motchu.  Ko kā tchakat __________ katoa k’ heke i aia ratau ko ana __________.

Rongomaiwhenua stayed on the island.  All the people now known as Moriori come from him and his children.  

K’ hēre to’ muritae, ko __________, k’ tere etu ki __________ ki ta raki ro. K’ taraua ia ki’ hoki etu murieneti i tena kā waka ki __________.

His younger brother, Rongomaitere, sailed on another adventure going to a place called Aote in the west. He gave the instructions for later waka to return to Rēkohu.

Song/proverb

Hokotauki: Ko Rongomaiwhenua ki ta nuk’, ko Rongomaitere ki ta moana. 

The descendants of Rongomaiwhenua inherit the land while Rongomaitere travels the oceans.

Improvisation

  • Students create and perform a play about this story.
  • Students write and recite a poem about this story.  
  • Students compose a short song about the characters in this story.

Art

Students can choose an aspect of the story and create their own illustrations or write a play and make costumes. 

Support them to write phrases or add relevant labels to their illustrations in rē Moriori.

They can use a variety of art media including:

  • paints and face paint, materials for costumes
  • recycled materials such as large plastic bags, bottles, or large cardboard boxes as props for the play. 

Research

  • Find other stories of migrations around the world and look at the similarities and differences.
  • Produce a PMI (Plus, Minus, Interesting) chart on the migrating and settling on new lands. This could be framed using Moriori terms such as ‘takina’ (good), ‘kore’ (negative), ‘hokoaro’ (consider).
  • Find out about types of waka and their purpose (sea travel, everyday use).

Other resources

Teacher

Ihimaera, W. (2020). Navigating the Stars, Māori Creation Myths. Penguin Random House. 

Useful web links

Mātauranga

History of wayfinding and celestial navigation

Hokotehi Moriori Trust

Word list of te reo Moriori

Moriori – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Moriori

Pacific navigation

He Whenua Rangatira: A Māori land

Canoe navigation

illo from story